How Does Car Insurance Work When Driving Other People’s Car?

January 13, 2017 · Posted in General Articles on Car Insurance 

Auto insurance is insurance purchased for cars. Its principal objective is to provide protection against losses incurred due to traffic accidents and liabilities subjected to accidents and car thefts. The majority of jurisdictions across the globe make it imperative to have assurance auto coverage before driving the vehicle on the public road. Insurance for both car and driver is mandatory by most governments of the world. Does that mean in occurrence of an accidental injury, your insurance policy will pay for your loss or someone else’s? How does car insurance actually work when driving other people’s car? This article aims at answering a pertinent question, which many of us seek to find answers to when stuck in a controversial situation.

A Personal Auto Insurance policy will cover the damages and medical liabilities of an uninsured motorist, operating your personal vehicle. In certain cases your personal insurance will cover the property damage as well. However, it will “not” provide cover for the operation of a hired business or commercial use vehicle.

It should be noted, that the car is insured, and not the driver. In case of a “personal” vehicle being driven, which has an adequate active coverage, the policy will be liable for the auto damage and the medical liability of the driver. However, if the “personal” vehicle insurance stands inadequate, then a part of the driver’s own active insurance policy will provide the medical benefits or the damage cover. The degree of coverage depends on factors like rentals, loaners, local or state regulations and reasons driving the other vehicle.

The assurance auto Montreal policy in force will cover the vehicle damage only if the driver had the owner’s “permission” to drive. Hence also covering the liabilities of the other parties involved. The insurance will also follow the driver, if they are mentioned in the policy of the car owner.

Insurance coverage varies with state. While, in some states, the policy will cover both the vehicle and the driver, whether or not the driver is enlisted in the policy of the car owner. Simultaneously, the car owner’s policy will provide coverage for him when he’s in the driver’s seat of another owner’s “personal” vehicle.

Most auto insurance policies will cover any driver of the insured vehicle, unless that driver has been excluded from the policy or unless the driver has stolen the vehicle. This would require the owner to press his situation, by providing a copy of the filed theft report or the filed exclusion report.

Since auto insurance follows the vehicle, if you’re driving a borrowed car and get involved in an accident, the lender’s insurance policy will cover the liabilities, your medical expense and the other vehicle’s damages. But, if the lender has no insurance or his insurance is inadequate, then the borrower’s insurance will step-in and cover all of the losses.

Car insurance companies offer “Drive Other Cars” advantage on the owner’s insurance policy to combat such situations. This policy provides comprehensive coverage on a driver who has the owner’s permission, as well as third party coverage for any injured individual in case of unexpected accidents. Different insurance companies provide different terms and conditions in order to receive “drive other car” benefits, and some may not even provide this advantage. Therefore, it’s advisable that you call your insurance company before lending or borrowing a car.

 

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